Gibson tossed following Ross' ejection

Gibson tossed following Ross' ejection

DENVER -- D-backs right fielder Cody Ross and manager Kirk Gibson were both ejected from Saturday's 4-3 loss to the Rockies in the middle of the seventh inning after home-plate umpire Chad Fairchild called Ross out on strikes to end the inning.

Fairchild had already had a called third strike challenged by Martin Prado on the inning's first out, but he let Prado slide. When Ross was called out, however, he flipped his bat high into the air, threw his batting helmet and started walking toward the outfield as Fairchild ejected him.

"I did not [say anything]," Ross said. "I just took strike three and threw my bat and was walking out to the outfield. I heard a roar, and I really didn't know what was going on, and I turned around and saw Gibby coming out. I assumed he'd thrown me out, so that's how I found out."

The D-backs had collected only two hits and no runs through the first seven innings, and the strikeout gave Ross an 0-for-3 night. The ejection further ignited Ross' raw emotions.

"It wasn't about [Fairchild], it wasn't about the strike zone, it was about being frustrated," Ross said. "If I had a problem with him, I would have turned around and told him. I would have said something right there. But [Rockies reliever Edgmer Escalona] made a perfect pitch, and it's frustrating when guys make perfect pitches on you sometimes. I reacted. He thought it was toward him, but it wasn't."

Ross erupted at Fairchild after the ejection, and Gibson was quick to get between the two, ultimately restraining Ross from behind, locking his arms in a bear grip before giving Fairchild his two cents on the call, leading to Gibson's subsequent ejection.

"He threw him out for flipping his bat, and I thought it was a short fuse," Gibson said. "I think he threw me out shortly, as well. But that's over with, we have a game to win [Sunday]."

The ejections were the first two of the season by a D-backs player or coach.

Owen Perkins is a contributor to MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.