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Roe tries to duplicate Minors success with D-backs

Roe tries to duplicate Minors success with D-backs

Roe tries to duplicate Minors success with D-backs play video for Roe tries to duplicate Minors success with D-backs

PHILADELPHIA -- The road to the Major Leagues can be long. D-backs right-handed reliever Chaz Roe took that to an extreme on Saturday. He woke up in Reno, Nev., where he was pitching for the Triple-A Aces. Recalled after J.J. Putz was placed on the disabled list with a dislocated right little finger, he flew to Philadelphia, changing planes in Denver.

He arrived at Citizens Bank Park in time for a game that eventually went 18 innings. The team bus back to the hotel left the park at 3 a.m. ET.

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But first, he came out of the bullpen to strike out Phillies pinch-hitter Erik Kratz with two out and two on in the 11th inning, then stayed on to set the side down in order in the 12th, notching two more strikeouts.

He pitched two more shutout innings Sunday, walking one and striking out one.

That's the sort of success Roe, 26, has had at Double-A Mobile and Reno this season, where he has a combined 1.11 ERA in 25 appearances. He hasn't been able to duplicate that in the big leagues to this point -- 5.40 ERA in five games in three separate stints before Saturday since making his Major League debut on July 1 -- but Kirk Gibson said that's not unusual for younger players.

"If you just look where he came from last year, he jumped many levels. He's done good to get this far," Gibson said. "He's in Triple-A and he's pitched good. He throws strikes, he moves the ball around, good slider.

"Ultimately, you try and do what you did at your previous levels. You try to duplicate it when you increase your level. But it's a different game, so it's harder. There is a period of adjustment. But he's been up here a couple times. And you find that every time they do come up that they're more comfortable, even with the surroundings and the schedule and what you're doing. They tend to trust themselves and their stuff better, and they tend to execute better."

Paul Hagen is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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